Six months after Demo Day, we find out what's happened to the companies since finishing the program. Who raised money, who fell apart, and who are the breakaway successes? (Source: Bloomberg)
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Demo Day is here. The teams pitch their companies to a room full of 500 investors. The entrepreneurs need to nail their presentations, or blow their big chance at landing funding. (Source: Bloomberg)


 
 
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With Demo Day approaching, the companies focus in on raising money. Venture capitalist Mark Suster analyzes their pitches. One company has trouble hiring; another can't find a business model; a third nearly blows up. The winning team meets AOL CEO Tim Armstrong. (Source: Bloomberg)


 
 
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The entrepreneurs must implement all the mentor advice, and focus on a direction. Venture capitalist Fred Wilson evaluates their businesses. The team of the week wins a meeting with the CEO of Twitter, Dick Costolo. (Source: Bloomberg)


 
 
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The companies settle into the Loft. How will they deal with mentor whiplash -- conflicting advice from dozens of the top minds in tech? Which company will stand out and win face time with their tech idol? (Source: Bloomberg)


 
 
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TechStars New York begins. The entrepreneurs battle for the few spots in the Loft. Meet the Davids, who run the elite incubator, and the top minds in tech who will mentor the companies through the toughest three months they'll ever face as entrepreneurs. Who's got problems with their business right off the bat? (Source: Bloomberg) 


 
 
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British entrepreneur Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin empire, talks about how he carved his unique path to success.


 
 
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Kaleil Isaza Tuzman and Tom Herman have had a dream since they became friends at age fifteen: get rich by developing their own dot com company, in some aspect of computer technology interface. Now in their late twenties, they have now come up with the idea they believe will make their riches, namely as Tom refers to it, "parking tickets": the company will be the on-line revenue collection interface for municipal governments. GovWorks.com came into existence in May 1999 with only an idea. The process of building the business focuses on obtaining venture capital based solely on the idea, with the actual mechanics of the website seemingly almost an afterthought, or at least one left primarily to the hired help. Regardless of the strength of the idea itself in raising this capital, another initial problem they face is what they see as non-commitment by a third partner, Kaleil's friend Chieh Cheung.


 
 
The sharks hear about a life-saving idea, a new learning technique and a burgeoning gourmet-food business.

 
 
In the series premiere, a baker with a family pie recipe, an inventor with a technological gizmo and a nanny with a fun, easy way for kids to take their medicine pitch their ideas to a panel of business magnates to raise money for their ventures.